Archives for category: French

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During a busy weekday, I sometimes find myself looking for recipes on my phone at the grocery store because I’ve had no time to plan dinner. Epicurious.com, which is a recipe collection from several different publications, including Bon appetit, and Gourmet, is one of my go to places to search. One link led to another and I found myself looking at a beautiful plate of perfectly pan roasted chicken with a gravy like sauce. Sometimes a nice looking photo is all it’scneeded to convince me to try the recipe. Plus, it looked very hearty and comforting, which is what I usually crave after a long day at work.

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I was on a roll with cooking food en Papillote, or “in parchment” style, that I did two dishes in one evening for dinner. Previously I had made a Tomato Basil Sauce with Polenta, and while I was researching that recipe, I also found a recipe for Halibut cooked en Papillote with summer vegetables and tomatoes. Read the rest of this entry »

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Finishing up our special Tuesday dinner, I made my boyfriend’s favorite dessert with a twist. Creme brûlée is not something you want to play around too much with because it’s such a classic dessert. The simple combination of egg yolk, sugar, cream, and vanilla makes the silky and creamy custard filling, and the ingenious sugar crust really elevates it as a sophisticated dessert.

This butterscotch creme brûlée substitutes brown sugar for white sugar, and adds milk chocolate to the cream mixture to give it a darker flavor. To make the filling, heavy whipping cream, brown sugar, salt, and milk are heated in a pot over medium low heat until the sugar completely dissolves and tiny bubbles starts to form on the edges of the pot. Melted chocolate and vanilla are whisked into the pot, and the hot cream mixture is slowly poured and whisked into egg yokes. The hot liquid will cook the egg yokes, which is why you need to whisk constantly as the cream is poured into the eggs.

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The liquid is strained to rid of any large bits of eggs that may have been formed during the whisking process. This will ensure the Creme brûlée is silky smooth and not gritty. The cream mixture is poured into ramekins, the ramekins placed in a roasting pan, and hot water poured into the pan until it reaches half way up the sides of the ramekins.

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The Creme brûlées are baked in a 300 degree oven until the edges of the custard sets and the centers are slightly jiggly, about 40 minutes.

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The custards are chilled for at least 5 hours in the refrigerator. When ready to serve, brown, turbinado, or Demerara sugar are sprinkled on top of the custards.

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You can brown the sugar in the oven with the broiler, or you can use a mini torch which is what I used. Either way, the custard should be placed in the freezer immediately after the sugar browns for the custard to stay chill, about 5 minutes.

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The butterscotch Creme brûlée are topped with a few caramel corns, and served with more on the side. The recipe includes instructions on how to make your own caramel corn, but I cheated and used store bought ones.

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Butterscotch Creme Brûlée with Caramel Corn : http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/butterscotch-creme-brulee-with-caramel-corn